Post by Category : Home Care

Hazardous Waste

It’s not uncommon that when you purchase a property, the seller leaves their paint. See how to remove hazardous materials according to the city’s guidelines.

On the Road with Roger is a series of exciting videos about Seattle neighborhoods and real estate topics. If you are looking to buy or sell real estate in the Seattle metro area, Roger Morris Real Estate can help you! Contact me for more information about this or other real estate questions.

Click Here to contact Roger Morris.

Your Winter Gardening Chores  0

fall bench outdoors-001

Has your garden been neglected over the last few months? If you are like me, you might be itching to get out in the yard and do a little clean-up. Following are a few chores you can do now to make sure your garden is ready for a successful spring.

  1. Remove all fading annuals and veggies.
  2. Cut back all perennials that either die back in winter or can benefit from “dormant pruning”.
  3. Prune damaged, diseased, or overlapping branches from trees and shrubs.
  4. Rake up any leaves to avoid fungal spores and insect eggs from infecting the soil and plantings.

Source: GardeningKnowHow.com

 

How to Prevent Burglaries – On the Road With Roger  0

A home invasion is scary. You can take steps to prevent a burglary from happening to your home or personal property. I’ve compiled some tips from Allstate Insurance and the Seattle Police Department on preventing home invasions.

8 important steps that will help prevent burglaries:

  1. When you move into a new home, make sure to change all the locks. You don’t know who had keys before you moved in. In addition, if you ever lose your keys, replace the locks.
  2. Install deadbolt locks on all exterior doors and use metal bars on sliding doors.
  3. Install an alarm system. They are one of the best defenses against home invasion. Generally, intruders are deterred by a house with a Security System sign in the front yard.
  4. Add timers on exterior lights and install motion sensor lighting directed at any entries and vulnerable areas of your home.
  5. Install safety glass or security film on vulnerable windows.
  6. Trim trees and shrubs to allow visibility to windows and doors.
  7. Double-hung windows should be secured with locking pins.
  8. Never leave ladders out and make sure they are not easily accessed.

 

For more home invasion prevention tips, visit Allstate Insurance and Seattle Police Department. Also be sure to check your local community police department for location-specific tips.

On the Road with Roger is a series of exciting videos about Seattle neighborhoods and real estate topics. If you are looking to buy or sell real estate in the Seattle metro area, Roger Morris Real Estate can help you! Contact me for more information about this or other real estate questions.

Baby, It’s Cold Outside: Get Comfy Inside  0

winter fall guy with warm hat

Winter cold has arrived in the Seattle area, some parts even saw snow this past weekend! When the temperature dips and the days get shorter, you’ll probably want to spend more time indoors. Make sure your home is comfortable and cozy with the following energy-saving tips:

  1. Brighten up your space without turning on more lights by cleaning dirty light fixtures and dusty bulbs.
  2. Besides door and window leaks that let in cold air, seal up air leaks around recessed lights, electrical boxes, and wall outlets.
  3. Replace traditional gas and wood fireplaces with a gel fireplace insert. It’s smoke-free and doesn’t send heated air out the chimney.
  4. Invest in indoor plants which increase humidity levels and decrease dust.
  5. Vacuum tip: Set your thermostat to “Fan On” while vacuuming to help filter dust that gets stirred up. Leave the fan on for 15 minutes after you finish then switch the thermostat back to the “Auto” setting.
  6. Change your HVAC filter every 3 months to prevent dust from recirculating.
  7. Clean your windows! Clean glass lets more light in and helps warm up the house naturally.
  8. Paint rooms that don’t get much sunlight in cozy reds, oranges, or yellows to help the room feel warmer.

Have any other cozy tips to share? Leave a comment and let us know.

Source: Houselogic

How to Hang Art in Your Home (Hanging Art 101) – On the Road with Roger  0

There are many nuances to hanging art in your home – Do you have tall ceilings? Do you have a large room? But there are some standard rules for how high or how big the art should be. Generally, you should try to fill as much space on the wall as possible, depending on the furniture arrangement. For example, if you are hanging art above your couch, the bottom of the frame should be 6-8 inches above the sofa.

Artwork should sit at eye level. What exactly does that mean you ask?

STEP 1: MEASURE THE ARTWORK (image)

Measure the height of the artwork and divide that number by 2.

STEP 2: MEASURE THE WIRE (image)

Measure the distance between the top of the picture wire (when stretched) and the top of the frame.

STEP 3: FIGURE OUT YOUR MAGIC NUMBER (image)

Subtract the amount from Step 2 from the amount from Step 1.

STEP 4: FIGURE OUT WHERE TO PUT THE PICTURE HANGER (image)

Add 57 to your magic number. 57” is the standard for museum eye-level artwork. Mark the measurement on the wall in pencil. Most museums swear by the picture wire and picture hanger, which include a hook and a nail.

Install the picture hanger and hang.

On the Road with Roger is a series of exciting videos about Seattle neighborhoods and real estate topics. If you are looking to buy or sell real estate in the Seattle metro area, Roger Morris Real Estate can help you!Contact me for more information about this or other real estate questions.

Should I Have a Sewer Scope Done? – On the Road With Roger  0

Many new homebuyers wonder what’s the big deal about a sewer scope? Doesn’t the utility company take care of that? The utility company is responsible for the main sewer line. The homeowner is responsible for the connection from the main sewer line to the house.

As you may have seen in my “Rogerisms” video, I like to call a sewer scope a colonoscopy for the house. A sewer scope inspects your sewer line from your home to the main city sewer line connection. In this episode of “On the Road with Roger, I talk with Todd Vecchio from Inside Out Sewer Inspection about the process and common issues.

On the Road with Roger is a series of exciting videos about Seattle neighborhoods and real estate topics. If you are looking to buy or sell real estate in the Seattle metro area, Roger Morris Real Estate can help you! Contact me for more information about this or other real estate topics.

Throwback Thursday: Flooring for Your Mid-Century Home  0

It’s Throwback Thursday! I’m revisiting old posts…

 

Flooring Inspiration for the Mid-Century Home

December 3, 2013

Tired of the peeling, cracking vinyl flooring or chipped tiles in your mid-century home? When considering your next flooring options, go “outside the box” for inspiration and ideas. I know I’ve said don’t rip up the original tiles in previous blog posts, but sometimes replacing the whole floor becomes more cost-effective than tracking down enough tiles to acceptably match that flamingo pink. How about some of these options?

Concrete: Like me, you might have a basement that’s in need of some TLC. Go “naked”…rip up the flooring and embrace your concrete. Many options exist today for overlays, polishing, and more.

Wood in the Kitchen: You don’t need to stick with vinyl in the kitchen. Wood flooring to match the rest of the house (have you looked under those carpets lately?!) makes for a seamless transition.

Living03

VCT: Love the look of those old vinyl tiles that look like they’ve been scuffed a million times over? The answer is Azrock TexTile, environmentally-friendly, economically smart, and retrotastic!

For more inspiration and ideas, check out Retro Renovation and Houzz.

How to Store More Without a Storage Unit  0

Go beyond the lazy susan in the cupboard!

The never-ending battle of stuff is most prevalent when you live in a small dwelling. Where do you store all those holiday decorations, high school mementos, and ski gear in a 900 square foot home without compromising garage space for your car? Here are a few ideas:

Basement crawl spaces

“Basement crawl spaces or open areas under apartment floors can be lined with shelves and outfitted with folding stairs to hoard anything. A finished 10×10 crawl space uncovers about $11,000 of space value and can even lower your energy bills.” More at HouseLogic.

No pantry, no problem

Small kitchens rarely come with enough storage for canned foods and spice containers. Build a portable, rolling pantry between the refrigerator and a wall.  Find the project instructions at Classy Clutter.

Savvy shelf dividers

The linen closet can be hard to tame. Install shelf dividers to separate stacks of towels and sheets so the piles don’t fall over or onto the floor.

Overhead Room

Overhead areas including those over narrow doorways, in many cases the bathroom, make an ideal place for floating shelves and cabinets. Get the DIY instructions at The 2 Seasons.

Need more inspiration? Head over to my Home Organization Pinterest board.

 

How Long to Keep Home Records  0

So many documents, so little space. For most of us, we don’t have rooms and rooms to store all of our tax records and home appliance manuals, but if you will be filing an insurance claim or taking a tax deduction, you’d better have the paperwork to back it up. Here’s a handy checklist to make sure you’ll have them when you need them.

Home Sales Records

___ Home sale closing documents, including HUD-1 settlement sheet: keep as long as you own the property + 3 years

___ Deed to the house: keep as long as you own the property

___ Community/condo association CC&Rs: keep as long as you own the property

___ Receipts for capital improvements: keep as long as you own the property + 3 years

___ Mortgage payoff statements: keep forever!

Annual Tax Deductions

___ Property tax payment: keep 3 years after due date of the return with deduction

___ Year-end mortgage statements: keep 3 years after due date of the return with deduction

Insurance & Warranties

___ Home repair receipts: keep until warranty expires

___ Inventory of household possessions: keep forever! (Don’t forget to make updates.)

___ Service contracts and warranties: keep as long as you own the item

For more information and tips, visit HouseLogic.

How Long Should It Last?  0

Knowing when the refrigerator is likely to stop working or the roof might spring a leak will better prepare you financially when it’s time to replace. Here are a few general rules from REALTOR® magazine:

100 years or more: brick siding, all wooden floors, cellulose insulation materials

50-100 years: slate, copper, and clay and concrete roofs; copper gutters; kitchen cabinets; modified acrylic kitchen sinks; vinyl floors

30-50 years: thermostats, wooden windows, wood shake roofs, French interior doors

10-20 years: built-in audio systems, aluminum windows, asphalt shingle roofs, faucets, kitchen sinks, gas ranges, cultured marble countertops, dryers, refrigerators, air conditioning units, lighting controls, interior and exterior paints, electric or gas water heaters, air conditioners, furnaces

5-10 years: security systems, heat and smoke detectors, dishwashers, microwave ovens, carpet

If it’s time to replace, make sure to check out Mr. Roger’s Recommendations for a list of contractors and more.